13KGHT73 Can you use the Solo Stove on a wood deck? – Flames Depot

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Can you use a solo stove on a wood deck

Can you use the Solo Stove on a wood deck?

Can you use the Solo Stove on a wood deck?

Wood deck

Introduction 

Yes, you can use the Solo Stove on a wood deck. But, you need to take caution as prolonged use of a Solo Stove on a wood deck could result in damages. 

What happens when you use a solo stove on a wood deck?

You may suffer a risk of radiant heat and sparks, which may pop out of the crackling wood from the Solo Stove. When your wood deck is subjected to heat stress over a long period, the wood deck can weaken and bear high chances of breaking.

Note - to prevent sparks from damaging your wood deck please use the official Solo Stove Shield

Official Solo Stove Shield

If the heat from your Solo Stove radiates downwards, it will most likely heat your wood deck. Since the Solo Stove has open flames, you need to think about the conditions you are lighting your Solo Stove from. If there is a breeze, you must take great care. If there is a strong wind outdoors, don't light the fire in your Solo Stove as the fire may burn your wood deck.

NOTE - It is recommended that you purchase a stand to go with your Solo Stove to prevent any damage to your wood deck. See Below

Official Solo Stove Stands

Precautions to follow when using a solo stove 

  • If you are camping or lighting your Solo Stove out in nature, ensure that you clear the wooden deck or any other platform where you intend to position your solo stove and the neighboring area. Eliminate any nearby flammable materials and avoid storing highly-flammable substances such as gasoline near your Solo Stove.
  • You should estimate how far a fire could potentially spread if your Solo Stove accidentally got overturned on a wood deck and use this to guide you on how much clutter you must clear.
  • Consider how dry the wood deck or the ground is and the surrounding areas before placing your Solo Stove there. A wet wood deck has lower chances of catching fire as compared to a dry wood deck. 
  • If you are camping in areas with grass, moss, and leaves, build several stones around your Solo Stove. The stones you use will help you ensure that you maintain a good safety circle around your Solo Stove. The stones will also serve as fire breaks if you don't encounter any sparks or anything else, resulting in a fire break. Afterward, eliminate any flammable substances within the rings. 
  • Keep your Solo Stove away from buildings. Do this since wind may cause flames to spread. You should never light your Solo Stove when the weather is windy or if it is soon being windy. Ensure that your Solo Stove is placed at least six feet away from the nearest building. This will promote safety. Remember, buildings can include sheds, small structures, houses, or garages.

Solo Stove Burning

  • You should always carefully cross-check above your Solo Stove site. Think about how the wind may blow the flames and how big the fire from your solo stove will be and eliminate any flammables. You are advised to leave a maximum of 20 feet between your solo stove and any overhanging structure. The overhanging structures can include branches, awnings, or patio overhangs. Do this because the fire coming from your solo stove will most likely produce excess heat. Although it doesn't really set fire to the overhanging structure, it could cause more damage.

Another downside of an overhanging structure is that it will block your solo stove from ventilating efficiently and could easily trap fumes around your Solo Stove. Don't sit near a Solo Stove placed under an overhanging structure to avoid suffocating from fumes or possible fire outbreaks. 

You should avoid placing your Solo Stove under an overhanging structure and let the fire and its components dissipate freely into the sky.

  • Don't use your Solo Stove on a boat. Using your Solo Stove on a boat isn't safe since the boat could easily knock your Solo Stove over, which could result in burning wood from the stove being spilled all over your boat. The Solo Stove is most likely to damage your boat's surface. Your boat may not be highly flammable, but it may not be made to be fire or heat-resistant.
  • When you combine the dangers of open flames with the limitations of sailing, it's best not to use a Solo Stove on a boat. If you must use a Solo Stove on a boat, only use boats and stoves designed for safe cooking.
  • You shouldn't use a Solo Stove on the back of pick-up trucks or trailers. These surfaces may be unstable and could result in fire outbreaks, especially if these surfaces are highly flammable or if highly flammable objects are stored there.
  • Use a Solo Stove stand to keep your wooden deck cool as the fire burns inside the fire pit of your Solo Stove. Untreated wood decks can ignite at 356°F. Because most wooden decks are treated using a stain or a sealant, you must use a Solo Stove stand when using your Solo Stove on a wooden deck. If you intend to burn longer than one or two hours, use pavers under your Solo Stove Stand to ensure that your wooden deck remains safe and beautiful.

Official Solo Stove Stands are Available Here

Solo Stove Airflow

  • Using a Solo Stove stand will lift your fire pit, allowing cool air to circulate under it for a cooler wooden deck base and a safer burning experience. 
  • When putting out a fire of the wood-burning kind in a Solo Stove placed on a wood deck, do the following;

        Leave the fire to burn and die on its own.

After the fire has died down, soak the remaining firewood, embers, and ash in water, and then stir the remaining slurry until the solo stove fire pit contents become saturated.

Like you do with water, include sand and dry dirt in your Solo Stove fire pit and mix until the fire is smothered.

Use a fire pit snuffer to put out the fire and leave it to cool on its own. Or, add water to fasten the cooling procedure after snuffing. 

Conclusion

You can use a Solo Stove on a wooden deck for a sizable period depending on whether the wood is treated or not. 

Purchasing a Solo Stove for use on your wood deck doesn't have to be dangerous as long as you take the proper precautions. Always use extreme caution when dealing with fire. 

Solo Stove on a Wood Deck

Different Solo Stoves that are Available Now

Solo Stove

Solo Stove Ranger

Solo Stove Bonfire

Solo Stove Yukon

 Solo Stove Accessories

Solo Stove Accessories

Solo Stove Stands

Solo Stove Shield

Solo Stove Lid

Solo Stove Shelter (Cover)

Flames Depot

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us! We're here to help. 

Call/Text - 1-800-208-9300

E-Mail - info@flamesdepot.com

Chat with us! ➡️

Flames Depot LLC 

1621 Central Avenue

Cheyenne, WY 82001

 

Can you use the Solo Stove on a wood deck?

Wood deck

Introduction 

Yes, you can use the Solo Stove on a wood deck. But, you need to take caution as prolonged use of a Solo Stove on a wood deck could result in damages. 

What happens when you use a solo stove on a wood deck?

You may suffer a risk of radiant heat and sparks, which may pop out of the crackling wood from the Solo Stove. When your wood deck is subjected to heat stress over a long period, the wood deck can weaken and bear high chances of breaking.

Note - to prevent sparks from damaging your wood deck please use the official Solo Stove Shield

Official Solo Stove Shield

If the heat from your Solo Stove radiates downwards, it will most likely heat your wood deck. Since the Solo Stove has open flames, you need to think about the conditions you are lighting your Solo Stove from. If there is a breeze, you must take great care. If there is a strong wind outdoors, don't light the fire in your Solo Stove as the fire may burn your wood deck.

NOTE - It is recommended that you purchase a stand to go with your Solo Stove to prevent any damage to your wood deck. See Below

Official Solo Stove Stands

Precautions to follow when using a solo stove 

  • If you are camping or lighting your Solo Stove out in nature, ensure that you clear the wooden deck or any other platform where you intend to position your solo stove and the neighboring area. Eliminate any nearby flammable materials and avoid storing highly-flammable substances such as gasoline near your Solo Stove.
  • You should estimate how far a fire could potentially spread if your Solo Stove accidentally got overturned on a wood deck and use this to guide you on how much clutter you must clear.
  • Consider how dry the wood deck or the ground is and the surrounding areas before placing your Solo Stove there. A wet wood deck has lower chances of catching fire as compared to a dry wood deck. 
  • If you are camping in areas with grass, moss, and leaves, build several stones around your Solo Stove. The stones you use will help you ensure that you maintain a good safety circle around your Solo Stove. The stones will also serve as fire breaks if you don't encounter any sparks or anything else, resulting in a fire break. Afterward, eliminate any flammable substances within the rings. 
  • Keep your Solo Stove away from buildings. Do this since wind may cause flames to spread. You should never light your Solo Stove when the weather is windy or if it is soon being windy. Ensure that your Solo Stove is placed at least six feet away from the nearest building. This will promote safety. Remember, buildings can include sheds, small structures, houses, or garages.

Solo Stove Burning

  • You should always carefully cross-check above your Solo Stove site. Think about how the wind may blow the flames and how big the fire from your solo stove will be and eliminate any flammables. You are advised to leave a maximum of 20 feet between your solo stove and any overhanging structure. The overhanging structures can include branches, awnings, or patio overhangs. Do this because the fire coming from your solo stove will most likely produce excess heat. Although it doesn't really set fire to the overhanging structure, it could cause more damage.

Another downside of an overhanging structure is that it will block your solo stove from ventilating efficiently and could easily trap fumes around your Solo Stove. Don't sit near a Solo Stove placed under an overhanging structure to avoid suffocating from fumes or possible fire outbreaks. 

You should avoid placing your Solo Stove under an overhanging structure and let the fire and its components dissipate freely into the sky.

  • Don't use your Solo Stove on a boat. Using your Solo Stove on a boat isn't safe since the boat could easily knock your Solo Stove over, which could result in burning wood from the stove being spilled all over your boat. The Solo Stove is most likely to damage your boat's surface. Your boat may not be highly flammable, but it may not be made to be fire or heat-resistant.
  • When you combine the dangers of open flames with the limitations of sailing, it's best not to use a Solo Stove on a boat. If you must use a Solo Stove on a boat, only use boats and stoves designed for safe cooking.
  • You shouldn't use a Solo Stove on the back of pick-up trucks or trailers. These surfaces may be unstable and could result in fire outbreaks, especially if these surfaces are highly flammable or if highly flammable objects are stored there.
  • Use a Solo Stove stand to keep your wooden deck cool as the fire burns inside the fire pit of your Solo Stove. Untreated wood decks can ignite at 356°F. Because most wooden decks are treated using a stain or a sealant, you must use a Solo Stove stand when using your Solo Stove on a wooden deck. If you intend to burn longer than one or two hours, use pavers under your Solo Stove Stand to ensure that your wooden deck remains safe and beautiful.

Official Solo Stove Stands are Available Here

Solo Stove Airflow

  • Using a Solo Stove stand will lift your fire pit, allowing cool air to circulate under it for a cooler wooden deck base and a safer burning experience. 
  • When putting out a fire of the wood-burning kind in a Solo Stove placed on a wood deck, do the following;

        Leave the fire to burn and die on its own.

After the fire has died down, soak the remaining firewood, embers, and ash in water, and then stir the remaining slurry until the solo stove fire pit contents become saturated.

Like you do with water, include sand and dry dirt in your Solo Stove fire pit and mix until the fire is smothered.

Use a fire pit snuffer to put out the fire and leave it to cool on its own. Or, add water to fasten the cooling procedure after snuffing. 

Conclusion

You can use a Solo Stove on a wooden deck for a sizable period depending on whether the wood is treated or not. 

Purchasing a Solo Stove for use on your wood deck doesn't have to be dangerous as long as you take the proper precautions. Always use extreme caution when dealing with fire. 

Solo Stove on a Wood Deck

Different Solo Stoves that are Available Now

Solo Stove

Solo Stove Ranger

Solo Stove Bonfire

Solo Stove Yukon

 Solo Stove Accessories

Solo Stove Accessories

Solo Stove Stands

Solo Stove Shield

Solo Stove Lid

Solo Stove Shelter (Cover)

Flames Depot

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us! We're here to help. 

Call/Text - 1-800-208-9300

E-Mail - info@flamesdepot.com

Chat with us! ➡️

Flames Depot LLC 

1621 Central Avenue

Cheyenne, WY 82001

 

Colt H

Colt H

About the Author - Colt is a USAF Veteran, Husband, Animal Lover, and an enthusiast for Grills, Firepits, & Fireplaces. He truly believes home is what you make it. He has dedicated himself to helping others experience lasting memories throughout their lives.

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